Charity « Taylor Herring

Charity

This is no Peter Rabbit: Illustrated storybook shows horrific experiences of inner-city children

Posted on July 5th, 2017 in Charity PR,Consumer PR,creative publicity,Stunt Of The Day,Uncategorized.

Daily difficulties in the lives of the inner-city youth are unimaginable for many of us who live in an alternate, privileged world. But VML in Kansas City had the challenge of communicating these horrors in an attempt to arouse empathy and increase awareness as part of a Youth Ambassador’s campaign.

The agency chose to communicate the dangers of inner-city violence through the form of an illustrated children’s storybook. The book is titled, “Welcome to My Neighbourhood”, and features images that touch upon real life issues such as drug abuse, violence and hunger. Though at first sight, the book appears to look like any other child-friendly story, the dark tales printed in its pages are ones that no child should ever have to hear, let alone be a part of.

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The three stories are completely true, and are written as they were told by the children who experienced each situation. The book was then sent to policymakers, funders and media outlets, as the agency asked them to donate time, money and power to put an end to these kinds of stories.



According to VML, the campaign received more than 50 million impressions from 30 different media outlets, and attracted large companies such as Cerner, UnitedHealthcare and Children’s Mercy Hospital to fund Youth Ambassadors.

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Music app Shazam loses its memory to highlight early warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease to younger generation

Posted on May 26th, 2017 in brand PR,Charity PR,Consumer PR,creative publicity,Music PR,PR Stunt,Stunt Of The Day.

For their latest campaign, Shazam, an app visited by many adolescents, effectively speaks to their prime audience and visually communicates to them the effect of Alzheimer’s. The music robot which we rely so heavily on (especially when we walk into a shop or party and love the name of the song that we can’t quite remember the name of) becomes human for a day, and like us or a sufferer of Alzheimer’s forgets!

“The Day Shazam Forgot” was a collaboration in which Shazam appeared to have difficulties remembering the songs users asked it to identify. When the app finally recalled the song, users were steered towards a call to action about Alzheimer’s disease and encouraged to make a donation towards the disease that impacts over 40,000 individuals under the age of 65 in the UK alone.

The appeal ran throughout April in the UK and the agency behind the campaign, Innocean Worldwide U.K says, “The Day Shazam Forgot” yielded 2,018,206 impressions, with 5,096 visitors visiting the Alzheimer’s Research U.K. donation page.

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The furry hero of the 2017 London Marathon unmasked: Mr Gorilla is still crawling his way to victory

Posted on April 26th, 2017 in Charity PR,Comedy,Consumer PR,creative publicity,Health and Fitness PR,PR Stunt,PR Stunts,Sport,Stunt Of The Day,Viral Video PR.

The London marathon is a hard enough feat as it stands as only those with peak fitness levels can handle the gruelling 26 mile stint around the capital. It goes without saying that with my diet currently made up of 70% takeaways and 40% chocolate I will not be competing any time soon and therefore I hold those who do manage to find the dedication and stamina to compete in very high esteem.  At yet some individuals, these paragons of goodness, go the extra mile (no pun intended) to push themselves further with the addition of peculiar and inherently cumbersome costumes all in the name of raising money for charity. Enter Mr Gorilla who is crawling his way into the nation’s hearts for a very worthy cause.

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Unmasked as Met Police officer Tom Harrison, aka Mr Gorilla apparently decided that running the marathon in a gorilla suit was not enough. No, in true gorilla fashion, this brave man decided that he was going to crawl across the entirety of the course and is at this very minute still making his way towards the finish line since starting his epic quest on Sunday morning.

Whilst still apparently in high spirits despite blistered and cut hands and knees the brave Mr Harrison quipped, “I’m going good, I’ve just been having a gorilla power nap. Just been napping on some bark chippings under an old tree, which is the perfect gorilla nesting habitat really”.

All of Mr Harrison’s efforts have been on behalf of The Gorilla Organization which is dedicated to conserving gorillas in Rwanda, Uganda and DR Congo, and Mr Harrison’s Just Giving page for his marathon effort has so far raised more than £1,500 for the charity.

Mr Gorilla hopes to complete his marathon on Friday a whole 5 days after starting. It is wonderful to see someone raising the profile of endangered gorillas in the mainstream media. And for once it is not about Harambe.

If you would like to support Mr Harrison in his efforts you can donate to his Just Giving page here. Go Gorilla man go!

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A cock and balls challenge to raise awareness of Testicular Cancer

Posted on April 3rd, 2017 in Charity PR,Comedy,creative publicity,Experiential Marketing,Fitness PR,Health and Fitness PR,Leisure PR,Stunt Of The Day.

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There is just something inherently funny about drawing a cock and balls. You will see them invoking uncontrollable giggles from scribbles on sleeping faces to viral videos of poor presenters unwittingly sketching phallic weather fronts. Now the classically crude image is being put to another use; for the greater good of men’s health.

As a whole young men have a reputation of being notoriously bad at talking about certain topics; with sensitive health and emotional matters coming top of that list. It is therefore unsurprising that testicular cancer is not something that is commonly discussed within usual social circles. However with such an unnecessary taboo surrounding the subject the disease is unfortunately being given the opportunity to spread, cutting many chances of a full recovery.

To combat this Testicular Cancer Research in New Zealand have concocted a fun, provocative and visual way to get men talking about their meat and two veg again loudly and proudly. They are challenging men and women alike to get involved in the #GoBallsOut campaign by creating various images of the infamous motif via their GPS enabled fitness apps during their excursions to then share on social media channels. In the spirit of inclusivity and diversity, I should point out that the drawings range from large to small, straight or curved depending on the choice of size or route leaving the exact dimensions of said tool in the hands of their creator. Participants are then given the task of nominating friends to join in and carry on the chain.

Some have already taken the challenge to the next level venturing off the well-trodden land and up into the sky to create their genital masterpieces.

Graeme Woodside, CEO of Testicular Cancer New Zealand, said in a statement, “We hope this campaign will get people talking and walking, we want young men to ‘Go Balls Out’ to show the world they’ve got the message, and are willing to start the conversation. Guys love some competition, and when it comes to cock and balls, they can get very competitive!”

So boys, head out the door, go for a run and share your penile artwork. It’s dicking about, but not as we know it!

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Would you want to drink this? One Water designs “dirty” water packaging to raise awareness for World Water Day 2017

Posted on March 23rd, 2017 in brand PR,Charity PR,Consumer PR,creative publicity,Stunt Of The Day.

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From my own experience it seems as if the only times that water is discussed is to either complain about its price (the classic: “£4 for a bottle of water!”) or whilst travelling to point out how the water tastes slightly yet strangely different.

It is safe to say that most of us in our affluent and bountiful lifestyles, full of new technology and the latest health fads, take clean water for granted. In fact as I write this I am sipping on a glass of chilled, filtered water without thinking twice about it. For us it is one of the most basic human rights and as simple as turning on a tap.

However as we all know in the back of our minds, far away from our direct view and the bustle of first world cities with their multitudes of Starbucks and Costa coffees, there are thousands upon thousands of people without access to clean water. It is estimated that even in 2017 1.8 billion people in the world are putting themselves at risk and contracting a myriad of horrific diseases such as cholera and typhoid due to their drinking systems being contaminated.

To thrust this incredibly important issue back into the limelight and the public’s fore thoughts just in time for World Water Day, One Water have designed a new sleeve for their bottles that makes it appear as if the liquid inside is dirty so that we too can experience, even if just in sight, drinking brown and murky water which for so many is their only way of life.

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Duncan Goose, founder of One Water, said: “It seems counter-intuitive to be trying to sell a bottle of water that looks dirty, but we think it’s a useful moment of reflection in our busy days and an opportunity to support a business that pours its profits into clean water for everyone rather than into the bank accounts of corporations.”

By summer of 2017 One Water have predicted that they will have raised £15million for water projects and hope that by 2020 that figure will have risen to £20million.

Mr Goose added: “If only a small proportion of the profits from the sale of every bottle of water went to clean water projects, we could have a huge impact on water issues worldwide. By drinking One Water you’re effectively saying to someone without access to clean water, ‘Have a clean drink on me.’”

The new alternative packaging is currently in their trial phase with hopes that it should reach shelves near us soon.

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