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The Generation Alpha Report

Posted on June 19th, 2019 in Children's Brands PR,Consumer PR,Taylor Herring News.

Move over Millennials and Gen Z, here comes Generation Alpha

Major new study reveals the attitudes and behaviours of the next generation of Brits under age 10

British children under age 10 are a tribe of tech-savvy, environmental-activists who are embracing traditional outdoor activities, according to a new in-depth study into the behaviour, goals and attitudes of Generation Alpha.

The ground-breaking research charts the rise of kids born since 2010 (the year Instagram and the iPad launched), with the UK on course to hit peak Gen Alpha in 2025 – by which time there will be 2 billion around the globe.

 

The wide-ranging report, carried out by Beano Studios’ in-house kid first consultancy Beano for Brands, of over 2,000 British children and their parents, reveals 86% of kids under 10 are using new technology to design, build and make things.

With over half of those surveyed (55%) regularly creating video content; tinkering with electronics (47%); enjoying robotics (43%) and computer coding (36%) – Gen Alpha has the potential to spawn the next wave of Elon Musks before they even leave school.

Although they are the first generation born in a truly digital world, Gen Alpha say they are not tech-dependent, unlike their selfie and app-addicted millennial parents.

Almost half (48%) of Gen Alpha kids often spend time away from devices and tech, compared with just 29% of their older siblings (Gen Z).

The activities they’re interested in are more reminiscent of their grandparents than their parents, with more Gen Alpha kids (42%) enjoying handicraft activities like knitting and crochet than Gen Z kids (32%). The research shows 98% are still playing outside, and nearly three quarters (72%) are still climbing trees.

The research also reveals that Gen Alpha will be a new wave of activists, questioning everything ranging from stereotypes on gender to climate change denial. Already one in five kids (19%) aged between 5-9 have been on a march or protest about something they care about. Half of Gen A parents (47%) support their children speaking out when it comes to activism.

Emma Scott, CEO at Beano Studios, said: “Gen Alpha is the generation that will seek to bend the digital world to their needs and ambitions and not be defined or consumed by it; they will set aside our current worldview stereotypes of identity and difference and their love for cherishing and saving the physical world around them will literally change the face of our planet. Beano for Brands’ Generation Alpha report is just the beginning. We’ve only just started to scratch the surface of this exciting, impassioned generation. With the oldest of Gen Alpha yet to reach secondary school, Beano for Brands will continue to monitor their progress and educate the world on who they are and what we as parents, educators, legislators and businesses need to do to keep up with them.”

Amongst the many findings of the Beano for Brands report, are Five Trends of Gen Alpha that are set to define the upcoming generation:

1. Digital Masters: When it comes to all things online and digital, Gen Alpha are streets ahead of their digital native millennial parents.

2. The New Old Fashioneds: Despite their digital mastery, and almost being born with a mobile device in their hands, Gen Alpha are nonetheless showing signs of being the ‘new old fashioneds’ with a return to ‘playing out’ and valuing family time.

3. Creative Entrepreneurs: Gen Alpha look set to be the ‘architechs‘ of a new found tech-enabled creativity

4. Activists in the Home: From school strikes to protesting against single use plastics, Gen Alpha kids are the activists in the home. They question everything from stereotypes on gender to climate change denial.

5. Post-Stereotypes: Gen Alpha is the first generation to judge people by who they are, not what they are.

A topline summary of the research and access to the full whitepaper can be found at <URL>.

Notes to Editors:

The Five Trends of Gen Alpha – In Depth

Trend One: DIGITAL MASTERS:

When it comes to all things online and digital, Gen Alpha are streets ahead of their digital native millennial parents.

Parents Behaving Badly

Gen Alpha is the first generation of digital masters, and it’s their digital native millennial parents who are lagging behind their children’s tech-spectations.

Even though they are still aged under 10, nearly half of Gen Alpha kids (45%) are anti-‘sharenting’ and want their parents to ask their permission before posting their photograph online, while the majority of parents (60%) disagree and would post without asking.

Bad Influencer(s) and Cancel Culture

Gen Alpha has a strong moral compass and are outspoken critics of the attitudes, ideologies and behaviours of some social media influencers.

The report shows that two thirds (62%) of Gen Alpha frequently see YouTubers behaving in ways with which they don’t agree.

And they don’t passively accept it. Cancel Culture is alive and well for Gen Alpha.

Take YouTube megastar James Charles who lost 3 million subscribers to his YouTube channel in just days as a reaction to what young followers saw as brattish and ungrateful behaviour.

Fake News spotters

Parents also greatly underestimate their children’s confidence online, with 73% of Gen Alpha saying they’re confident using the internet and know what to do if they see something upsetting. Only 58% of their parents thought this was the case.

Compared to the kids’ point of view, it appears that parents underestimate Gen Alpha’s confidence online and their propensity for discovery, while overestimating the skills of Gen Z children (58% and 85% respectively).

Gen Alpha are inquisitive and don’t take information at face value. Some 73% think it’s important to question what’s online and, despite ‘fake news’ only entering mass consciousness in January 2017 through Donald Trump, three in 10 (31%) already feel they know how to spot it.

Trend Two: THE NEW ‘OLD FASHIONEDS’

Despite their digital mastery, and almost being born with a mobile device in their hands, Gen Alpha are nonetheless showing signs of being the ‘new old fashioneds’ with a return to ‘playing out’ and valuing family time.

Rather than being hooked to a screen in their bedrooms, Gen Alpha has a new tech-enabled freedom which empowers them to get out and about channeling their natural curiosity and using screens to learn about good old fashioned playing out.

They are being encouraged to get back to nature by their millennial parents – perhaps as a reaction against their own more cosseted upbringing.

They like to play outdoors rather than inside and are encouraged to play independently and ‘go their own way’ while developing interests in ‘old fashioned’ activities like foraging, bushcraft, treehouse-making and den-building.

Gen Alpha still enjoys playing outside often (47%) with nearly a third preferring to play outside ‘all the time’ rather than watching other kids playing with toys on YouTube (29% vs 19%).

Gen Alpha is tech-empowered, not tech-dependent. Unlike selfie and app-addicted millennials, almost half (48%) of Gen Alpha kids often spend time away from devices and tech, compared with just 29% of their older siblings Gen Z. The activities they’re interested in are more reminiscent of their grandparents than by their parents, with more Gen Alpha kids (42%) enjoying handicraft activities like knitting and crochet than Gen Z kids (32%).

Parents’ concern about kids spending too long on screens is understandable, but the research shows 98% are still playing outside, and nearly three quarters (72%) are still climbing trees.

Gen Alpha very comfortably straddles the online and the natural world and more highly value time spent with the family and the older generations than their older sblings – reconnecting generations in a way that was recently less common. Sixty-two per cent of Gen Alphas are spending time with older people (i.e. grandparents) every week.

Trend Three: CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURS

Gen Alpha look set to be the ‘architechs’ of a new found tech-enabled creativity.

The study found that 86% of Gen Alpha kids enjoy designing, making and building things and their specific interests are encouraging reading for creative and tech industries:

– Over half (55%) enjoy making creative videos
– 47% of Gen Alpha enjoy tinkering with electronics
– Two thirds like creating new worlds digitally
– Four in ten (43%) enjoy robotics
– Over a third (36%) enjoy computer coding

Gen Alpha has the potential to be creative entrepreneurs, valuing talent and skills and having the vision to translate creativity into business realities. Over half of Gen Alphas believe they could make a career out of their hobby, and 60% of their parents agree. Amazingly, a fifth are already making money from their hobbies.

With unfettered access to information, and a natural interest in this tech-empowered creativity, this will potentially be the generation which spawns the next Elon Musks before they even leave school – which businesses and universities should be thinking about how to harness.

Trend Four: ACTIVISTS IN THE HOME

From school strikes to protesting against single use plastics, Gen Alpha kids are the new activists in the home. They question everything from stereotypes on gender to climate change denial.

Kids are known for pester power – but their influence is no longer defined by the scream for a chocolate bar at the supermarket checkout. The recent kids’ protests over the environment shows the direction Gen Alpha seems to be heading, and one in five of those aged between 5-9 have already been on a march or protest for something they care about. No doubt supported by their parents, almost half of whom support their children speaking out.

Kids are significant influencers in their own homes – across everything from choice of car to holiday destination to the weekly shop. And increasingly, Gen Alpha kids are being guided by their moral compass to focus on ‘pestering’ for good. Beano for Brands’ previous research showed that 40% of 6-14 year olds visiting Beano.com feel it’s their responsibility to save the planet.

Trend Five: POST-STEREOTYPES

Gen Alpha are the first generation to judge people by who they are, not what they are.

Gen Alpha girls are encouraged to reject narrow gender stereotypes of themselves as ‘princesses’ and ‘dreamers’ – to take inspiration instead from rebellious and capable women across cultures and history, to aspire towards athleticism and STEM accomplishments, and to reimagine girlhood as something empowering and liberating.

Gen Alpha has moved on from a binary rejection of pink for girls into a post-stereotype mindset – perhaps summed up best by the attitude ‘I can wear pink AND play football’. This is supported by their parents, 6 in 10 of whom agree that inclusive product ranges are important. Yet there’s a distinct gap in attitude towards gender itself between parents and their Gen Alpha kids, with 32% of parents feeling their child’s gender doesn’t matter, compared to 58% of kids.

Will Gen Alpha be the generation of Rebel Girls and Lost Boys?

While parents of girls are more likely to agree they don’t want their child limited by their gender, parents of boys are showing a generational difference from Gen Z boys to Gen Alpha, with a +8% shift, suggesting parents are becoming increasingly keen boys aren’t left behind.

This concern is reflected by the children themselves, with 66% of girls agreeing their gender is not important, but only half of boys, indicating that gender does matter to boys more and reflecting a wider debate about the role of boys in today’s society.

Finally, the study suggests Gen Alpha will form, project and take pride in social identities based on their own individual feelings, thoughts and interests as opposed to those dictated to them by external forces.

Already, older Gen Alphas are using social engagement and activism to critique the political status quo. The report shows that 19% of Gen Alpha have taken part in a march or protest on an issue they care about.

This activism is inspired in part by Gen Alpha and Gen Z parents, who believe it is important that children are encouraged to speak out and stand up for what they believe in.

About Beano for Brands:

Beano for Brands is a kid first consultancy for brands wanting to engage with older kids, Generation Alpha and their parents.

Beano Studios is a rebellious content business, driven by insight and data, which creates, curates and delivers entertainment for kids of all ages worldwide. The Studio produces diverse entertainment across multiple destinations; including TV, digital content, theatrical projects, consumer products, plus the legendary comic and annual.

The multi award-winning Beano.com is the UK’s fastest growing kid’s entertainment site, with 5M monthly reach across the Beano network.

Beano Studios’ International Emmy nominated Dennis & Gnasher: Unleashed! has now landed on Netflix in the US after becoming the CBBC’s highest rated animation at launch and sold across Europe. In 2018 SO Beano!, a presenter-led entertainment show inspired by the hottest trends and most loved content on Beano.com, launched on Sky Kids.

Press Enquiries: Taylor Herring +44 208 2065151

Just watch your step! AirBnB offer one night stay in an amazing LEGO house!

Posted on November 3rd, 2017 in App PR,brand PR,Children's Brands PR,Consumer PR,Kids PR,PR Stunt,Publicity Stunts,Retail PR,Stunt Of The Day,Tourism PR,Toy PR,Venue PR.

AirBnB have teamed up with LEGO to offer one lucky family with the chance of spending a night at the recently opened LEGO House in Billund, Denmark – the home of the famous children’s toy. Most importantly, there will be LEGO proof slippers, so you don’t have to wince at the thought of stepping on a stray block.

Almost everything, from the furniture to the decorations, is entirely made from LEGO (even an adorable LEGO cat). Thankfully, the mattress, pillows, and duvet, are the only things NOT made from the little blocks; just make sure to check the bed before you lie down!

The quirky holiday will be hosted by Master Lego Builder (or design manager specialist), Jamie Berard. With his assistance, the winning family will take part in fun LEGO activities like making their own LEGO films, building robotic cars, and designing a meal using LEGO, which is then served by two robot waiters!

To win, all families have to do is describe what they would make is they had an unlimited supply of LEGO bricks – Berard will even try to assist with building it during your stay! Unfortunately, LEGO has yet to announce if they will be releasing an instruction booklet to build the house yourself, here’s hoping!

@Joesharp1996

Never “Lego” of your imagination: Lego brings children’s crazy creations to life

Posted on April 7th, 2017 in brand PR,Children's Brands PR,Consumer PR,creative publicity,FMCG,Kids PR,Leisure PR,Stunt Of The Day,Toy PR.

The wonderful people at the Lego Group have made a cloud that rains candy, after gathering a group of kids at their ‘Lego Playgroup’ and asking them “if you could build anything, what would you make?”. Of course these young, imaginative children  built something only dreams are made of; a rainbow cloud that rains candy!

Lego commissioned a group of Aeronautical Engineering students from Singapore Poly-Tech to make the kids dream a reality. The engineers build a drone-powered cotton wool cloud, which actually RAINED CANDY!

One student involved in the project said “I think as we grow up, we have this preconceived idea of what can and can’t be done, but as kids they don’t really have that., so they’ve got this boundless imagination”

The look of amazement that washes over the kids faces when they see their magical candy cloud float down is simply heart warming. Now if only we could order one for the office!

– @mckinleykearney

Mr Men and Little Miss become the new face of Royal Mail stamps

Posted on October 20th, 2016 in Book PR,Children's Brands PR,Kids PR,Retail PR,Stunt Of The Day.

To celebrate the 45th anniversary of Roger Hargreaves’ Mr Men, The Royal Mail have commissioned sets of collectible stamps displaying all your favourite characters from the series, including Mr Bump, Little Miss Sunshine and Mr Tickle.

Since 1971, the Mr Men and Little Miss series have sold over 100 million copies in 28 countries and are sure to be the ideal nostalgic companion for Royal Mail users. Roger Hargreaves’ son Adam, who took over the business after his father’s death in 1988, commented that his father ‘would be chuffed’ at the news and they hope that the stamps will ‘brighten up sending and receiving mail’.

Mr Men

At 64p per stamp or £6.40 for the full set, full sell-out is expected quickly. The stamps will go on sale in Post Office branches nationwide and via the Royal Mail website for the next 12 months.

– @turnthq

Powerpuff Girls take on Dubai

Posted on June 3rd, 2016 in Children's Brands PR,creative publicity,Kids PR,PR Stunt,Stunt Of The Day,Television Industry PR,Television PR.

Cartoon Network succeeded in attracting attention when it announced the release of a new series of The Powerpuff Girls.

Their clever plot to catch the eye of the people of Dubai was more effective than they could have anticipated- it even had people running in pursuit and pointing. To promote the return of the famous characters Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup, 3 custom made drones were created.

powerpuff

To the amazement of onlookers, these drones embarked on a scenic, aerial tour of Dubai. Their flight path included a low altitude trip over some of Dubai’s most iconic sights such as Kite Beach, Burj Al Arab and Burj Khalifa.

In the video put out by Cartoon Network the Powerpuff drones zip through the air superman style to the theme tune of the famous cartoon.

Kids stared open-mouthed as they flew by, but the legendary trio caused the greatest stir amongst people who had been alive to witness them in action on screens in the 90s. In interviews those who had witnessed the Powerpuff girl’s fly through recounted nostalgic tales of great times spent watching the Townsville triplets. It is fair to say that after ten years of Powerpuff free TV we are glad to see them back.

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